Category: ‘Flower and Plant Care’

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Spring Flowers and Plants Celebrate Easter

by Lisa Greene on April 11, 2017 at 12:04 pm

Easter Flowers by Lisa Greene, AAF, AIFD, PFCI: Blue hydrangea, peach hypericum, green roses, blue delphinium, iris and cymbidium orchids accented with pussy willow, eucalyptus and English ivy fill a ruffled white cache pot.For many, thoughts of Easter signal a feeling of new beginnings. Whether you look at spring in nature or to your inner self for an emergence of new hope for humanity, a glance at bright flowers reassures the psyche. Flowers bring peace, wonder and comfort in their simple beauty.

Celebrating Easter with flowers and plants is as simple as stopping by the florist shop. Pick up loose flowers to fill a favorite vase. Ask for a customized centerpiece, buffet arrangement or foyer piece with spring flowers to complement your home interiors. Here, blue hydrangea, peach hypericum, green roses, blue delphinium, iris and cymbidium orchids accented with pussy willow, eucalyptus and English ivy fill a ruffled white cache pot.

Great choices in blooming plants for Easter include azaleas, hydrangea, cyclamen and, of course, spring bulbs. The queen of Easter plants is the Easter lily with its stately white blossoms and once a year scent.

Easter lilies are easy to care for and can be enjoyed for several weeks. Place your lily in an area where it will get indirect or bright diffused light. Water your plant when the soil surface is dry; do not allow the soil to dry completely or conversely to waterlog it. It is recommended that you remove the pollen anthers when the flower first opens to save having to clean the yellow stains that they cause.  Read More

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Spring for Tropical Flowers

by Ardith Beveridge on March 18, 2017 at 2:08 am

Tropical Flowers - Photo Courtesy Ardith Beveridge, AAF, AIFD, PFCI, CAFA,Koehler & Dramm's Institute of Floristry in Minneapolis, https://www.kdfloralinstitute.com/I’m writing this post on a beautiful March morning when the wind is looking for the warm spring skies to blow in. This is the time of year when anything can happen weather-wise. In the past few days, we have had hail, snow, sunshine and wild turkeys walking around, even on busy roads.

One thing consistent about March is we like to brighten up our indoor spaces — our homes and offices. Tropical flowers are a great choice. They transport us to beautiful and exotic places.

I have always enjoyed designing with tropical flowers because of their beauty and also because of their unpredictable nature. Their lines, shapes, colors, sizes and textures change with each flower and create a stunning presentation. Everything goes together — no matching. Tropical flowers are stunning with roses, lilies, stock, and every other flower that comes to mind.  Read More

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Caring for Your Valentine’s Day Flowers

by Jenny Scala on February 15, 2017 at 6:29 am

Photo courtesy of Syndicate Sales, Inc.; <a href="http://www.syndicatesales.com" rel="nofollow">www.syndicatesales.com</a> Floral designer Alice Sweet, Palmer-Kelley, Carmel,INIsn’t it a wonderful feeling, getting flowers? Are you still smiling? I bet you are. Rutgers University research shows the presence of flowers makes us happy.

Make those good feelings last longer with a little tender loving care for your floral gift.

 It’s easy to care for flowers: 

  • Display your flowers away from direct sunlight, heating or cooling vents. Avoid placing flowers directly under ceiling fans
  • Check the water daily. Does the vase have enough water, and does it look clean? If the water becomes cloudy, you need to replace it, use the little flower food packets, and follow the directions. 
  • You also can re-cut stems by removing one to two inches with a sharp knife. And keep the leaves out of the water. 
  • For more details on flower care, click here

Enjoy your flowers and appreciate the Valentine who sent them to you!

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— Photo Courtesy Brian Wheat, AAF, PFCI, of Lafayette Florist, Gift Shop & Garden Center in Lafayette, Colorado. http://www.lafayetteflorist.com/It seems like only yesterday it was early spring when you journeyed to the garden center to select your blooming treasures. With the anticipation of good weather on the horizon, you were all aflutter with excitement of a good growing season. You stood in marvel at the greenhouse, looking in at the sea of colors and textures that soon would be yours. You carefully selected the perfect pot, the best potting soil and the best looking bedding plants they had to offer. You were on your way to an epic spring display after a long winter. So, you got it all hauled home, got it all planted and placed in the perfect location to enjoy all summer long.

Things are looking great. A month goes by, and still everything looks pretty good. Then all of sudden one afternoon, you notice it. The shine has worn off; you need help. This is a common occurrence for all of us flower and plant lovers. Care and maintenance is essential. There are many reasons things deteriorate a bit, such as a lack of dead-heading or fertilizer, insect or disease issues, weather, or even the location needs changed.

Here are some helpful tips to keep your patio pots, hanging baskets and flower beds performing at their best all the way into the fall. Read More

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WheatGrassSeedlings-LafayetteFlorist As the season turns, it’s like Mother Nature’s Broadway — a new cast of characters is in the wings and preparing for the next big show. The brown and lifeless landscapes give way to shades of green and the sprouts of bulbs begin to emerge. The chirps of robins and flashes of red cardinals wake up slumbering shrubs with explosions of yellow from the forsythia. Ah, spring is in the air.

I think we feel the change in our lives; the sun is warmer and the skies bluer, the air is fresher and it carries the promise of new growth. Our inner farmer begins to emerge; we envision ourselves in a simpler time, cultivating the land, growing our own food to feed our families and animals.

Fast forward 100 years, when all of these labors are almost forgotten. We just stop at the grocery store and pick up whatever we need to sustain ourselves. Many folks are harking back to a time when you knew where your food came from and how it was grown and processed. I’ve noticed a resurgence in gardeners wanting to grow their own vegetables and flowers, like their ancestors did. Sure, most of us don’t want to hitch-up a team of draft horses to a plow a rocky field, but we do want to get our hands dirty and get back to our roots by growing plants (pun intended). Read More