All Posts By Stephen Rittner

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Awesome Aesthetics at Art in Bloom

by Stephen Rittner on July 21, 2017 at 6:24 am

“Flowers in Frame” by Paeonia Designs This year’s Art In Bloom at Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts had some amazing displays. Floral designers paired works of art with tropical flowers. Another interpreted a black-and-white modern painting with flowers. There was even a floral arrangement designed differently on two sides to complement a Reliquary Figure.

And there was one floral design that wasn’t paired with a specific work of art — it literally mimicked art. “Flowers in Frame” by Paeonia Designs simulates a painting.

This floral design works so well on many levels. Check out what’s behind the frame:  Read More

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Floral Designs Match Works of Art

by Stephen Rittner on July 14, 2017 at 6:14 am

The fusion of floral designs with other types of art is celebrated in museums across the country with “Art in Bloom” exhibits. Art in Bloom originated in the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston in 1976. I love going to the exhibit every year. Here are some pieces from this year’s Art in Bloom at the MFA.

When you go to Art In Bloom, you never know what masterpieces will be paired with flowers. Will it be a bowl decorated by Jackson Pollock?

“Flight of Man” by Jackson Pollock interpreted with flowers by the Spade and Trowel Garden Club of Andover.

“Flight of Man” by Jackson Pollock interpreted with flowers by the Spade and Trowel Garden Club of Andover.

Or perhaps models of boats created by ancient Egyptians will inspire a floral designer.  Read More

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Valentine’s Day - Photo Courtesy The Rittners School of Floral Design, BostonThe origins of Valentine’s Day can be traced back to both ancient Roman and ancient Christian traditions. The holiday is associated with the Roman Lupercalia (a fertility festival) and to Christian Saint(s) who had romantic legends associated with that name.

Valentine’s Day is most often perceived as a celebration between lovers sending each other tokens of affection. While men buy mostly for romantic reasons, women use Valentine’s Day as an opportunity to show they care to mothers, friends, children, as well as their sweethearts. Women even treat themselves on Valentine’s Day.

Flowers, hearts and cupids are traditional symbols of love and affection. While the heart is an essential part of our circulatory system, it has long been associated with our emotions and has become symbolic of love and romance. Cupid, known through mythology as the god of love and desire, has come down to us as a chubby little cherub who likes to shoot arrows that inflame desire. Your florist can incorporate hearts and cupids into your Valentine’s Day gifts.   Read More

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Christmas Fun with Red and Green Florals

by Stephen Rittner on December 1, 2016 at 11:45 am

Christmas Flowers - Photo Courtesy The Rittners School of Floral Design, BostonChristmas means many different things to many different people. For some, it represents the birth of Jesus. For others, it represents peace on earth and goodwill to one another. To others, it represents winter weather and sports, wonderful sales and lots of presents. Regardless of your beliefs, Christmas is celebrated worldwide. Let flowers express your favorite parts of the Christmas season.

I enjoy celebrating with the traditional Christmas colors of red and green. Flowers can be designed and displayed in so many joyous ways in reds and greens. Here are just a few examples, and your local florist has so many more. Visit their shop for expertise and a truly festive experience.

A floral arrangement with berries, vines and evergreen foliage evokes a natural Christmas feeling.  Read More

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Flowers for Halloween

by Stephen Rittner on October 25, 2016 at 2:52 am

Halloween Flowers - — Photo Courtesy The Rittners School of Floral Design, BostonThe ancient Celts called it Samhain. It was believed that the dead and fairy folk could cross over into our world at that time. It was very scary in a world that lacked modern scientific sophistication. Halloween’s origins were obviously much more somber than our current celebration of the holiday.

Today’s Halloween is a festive time, where adults join the young in enjoying trick or treating, ghosts, spiders, witches and things that go bump in the night. Flowers can play a major role in creating an atmosphere and shaping space. There are so many fun ways to celebrate Halloween with flowers.

You can never go wrong with a witch. Hydrangea and berries bubble up in this delightful witch’s caldron. What a great conversation piece for an entry area, bay window or living room. Read More