Two major symbols for Thanksgiving are Turkeys and Cornucopia. It is amazing and fun to combine these symbols with flowers for wonderful floral designs for the holiday.

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The Turkey

Benjamin Franklin suggested that this wonderful and tasty bird become a national symbol. Unfortunately for the turkey it didn’t make the cut, losing to the bald eagle, and instead became our favorite food for the Thanksgiving holiday. A famous myth of the Thanksgiving holiday is that turkey was served for the first Thanksgiving. We don’t know if that was really true. It could have very well been goose, or something else. Turkeys throughout the continent are advocates of this “first goose” theory … along with promoting ham or even salmon for the holiday. Regardless of turkey politics, your guests will definitely enjoy not only the culinary turkey but also floral designs that incorporate the turkey as a visual symbol.

A wicker container in the shape of our favorite holiday bird can be the source of many festive floral designs…..

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You can use traditional fall colors like the previous arrangement or perhaps go with less obvious color groupings like red and green (a reminder of another holiday coming up soon!).

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Our bird can be funky!

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Or very funky!!!

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Or you can simply go wild and create an entire bird out of flowers!

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The Cornucopia

The Cornucopia is a horn that symbolizes abundance and plenty, for which we are appropriately thankful. This symbol can be traced back to Greek mythology. A horn that gives forth abundant food and drink was a pretty powerful symbol in a world before supermarkets. The pilgrims were acquainted with the various myths about the cornucopia and it is still a powerful symbol today.

Cornucopia are available in many materials ranging from metallic to ceramic to wicker. Place these on side boards, entry areas, or mantels.

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You can incorporate a wide variety of flowers and floral-related materials into cornucopia. Don’t forget to include branch materials, berries and even fruit and vegetables in your cornucopia designs.

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Here’s an idea: Once your main course is completed, remove the bird and side dishes from your dining room table. Place an amazing cornucopia in the center of the table as a focal point to admire and enjoy while having coffee and dessert.

Ask your florist for more ideas. Bring in your favorite container or ask what festive accessories they have that can enhance your holiday decor.