Lady Bird Johnson said, “Where flowers bloom, so does hope.”

Cherry Blossoms

Cherry Blossoms

“Every year of our lives, one thing is certain, the seasons will change, the sun will rise and set, and the flowers will bloom.” That’s my personal quote. (Maybe someday, some young writer will quote me. That would be cool … sorry, I digress.)

Gardeners and even non-gardeners notice the changes of our seasons, when the green patches of lawn peek out from a snow covered yard and the faces of pansies tilt upwards toward the sun on a cold late winter day. Fall planted, spring blooming bulbs, such as tulips, crocus and daffodils, start to emerge, their noses pushing through the soil. They’ll notice the buds on tree branches start to swell, the buzzing of bees, and a Red Breasted Robin with a worm in its beak preparing for a new family. They might notice the life giving moisture soaking into the ground, rejuvenating shrubs and rose bushes, slowly warming them out of their long winters nap. The spring rain cleanses the winter’s deposits from the fronds of juniper.

Azaleas

Azaleas

No doubt, Spring is my favorite time of year. Spring is when we celebrate regrowth and new beginnings.

Across the nation, there are times when you anticipate the next big show by Mother Nature. The rhododendrons in the southeast, cherry blossoms around the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C., the fragrant peonies on the plains of Central Illinois, to the golden aspens of fall in our mountains of Colorado and the tulips of Skagit Valley in Washington.

Daffodil

Daffodil

I could make a list of all these extraordinary displays, and every person reading this would add a few more from where they grew up or live. These natural events bless us and touch all of our senses, from the smell of lilacs and plumeria, to the soft touch of pussy willows, the sight of pampas grass on a hillside waving in the wind, to the taste of fresh rhubarb and the sound of rustling corn stalks in a late summer breeze, all bring up images of nature’s colorful bounty.

Tulips

Tulips

It sometimes touches our very fiber of who we are and stirs up memories of times past and future promises.  Nature and plants can affect our moods and well being. The overcast gray skies and gloomy frozen landscape of the Midwest can be depressing, and for some, the only cure is spring. The busy and sometimes hectic lives we live can be made more tolerable by just stopping and smelling the roses.

Tulips and Hyacinths

Tulips and Hyacinths

So my wish for you this  spring is to take a moment to look around at what nature has to offer. Bring branches of apple blossoms and forsythia indoors and let them bloom.  Visit a tulip festival.  Plant pansies and violas in a colorful pot.

Take a walk with the family around your neighborhood and spy on newly emerging flowers. Enjoy the promise of growth and admire creation. This cycle started long before we showed up and will continue long after we are gone. Embrace and thank nature for the gift of reengergizing us each and every spring.

Violas

Violas

Which flowers and plants do you look forward to watching bloom every spring?